Machistado: I don’t understand those who choose not to forgive. It’s weak and...

machistado:

I don’t understand those who choose not to forgive. It’s weak and self-destructive to live with so much anger and hatred in your heart rather than moving on so you can be at peace with your circumstances and more importantly, yourself. Such negativity eats away at you, it rots your soul. It’s…

86 notes

jtotheizzoe:

An Interactive Simulation to Count Alien Worlds

Enrico Fermi famously asked, in his paradoxical analysis of the likely existence of extraterrestrial life, “Where is everybody?” If there are a certain (large) number of planets in the universe that are habitable, then a subset of these (also a large number) should be inhabited. Any civilization that formed, given enough time, could develop the means for interstellar communication or travel.

So yeah, “Where is everybody?

Years later, Frank Drake developed a precise equation to calculate the likely number of inhabitable worlds within range of observation or communication from Earth. Well, it’s as precise as you define it, anyway, given that the variables that go in are just that - variable. Things like how long it would take a civilization to develop communication, how long said civilization would last, how many stars and planets are estimated to exist … just the basics.

It’s called the Drake Equation, and thanks to the stupendous folks over at BBC Future, you can go tweak the equation with an interactive tool! Click here to start defining your galaxial parameters and see how many civilizations you think should exist.

I’m getting some pretty big numbers . . !

(via BBC, tip o’ the SETI dish to Russ Creech)

(via el0h3em)

KnowTooMuch: Scientists: We May Find Alien Life On Saturn’s Tiny Moon Enceladus

anukkinearthwalker:

The grueling process will involve of a decade of preparation, sending a probe on a journey which takes seven years in each direction, with several years of sample collecting in the middle. But after all of that, we may have proof of non-Earthly life from a place where all signs point to its…

Creepy Crawly Cryptozoology: I’m always fascinated by people that think cryptozoology is nothing...

creepycryptozoology:

I’m always fascinated by people that think cryptozoology is nothing but myth and folklore.

Have you seen some of the known animals we have in the world?

Like…

The turtle frog. It’s a frog…that looks like a turtle without it’s shell.

Or a Promachoteuthis sulcus which, they didn’t even…

(Source: thecryptocreep)

the-odditorium:

WOW! Signal

The Wow! signal was a strong narrowband radio signal detected by Jerry R. Ehman on August 15, 1977, while working on a SETI project at the Big Ear radio telescope of The Ohio State University then located at Ohio Wesleyan University’s Perkins Observatory, Delaware, Ohio. The signal bore expected hallmarks of potential non-terrestrial and non-Solar System origin. It lasted for the full 72-second duration that Big Ear observed it, but has not been detected again. The signal has been the subject of significant media attention. - Wikipedia

(via paranormalexpresso)

4 notes

sexymachine:

slaves-shall-serve:

Our significance in the Universe.

Approximate scale

(via sans-nuage)

54,376 notes

jtotheizzoe:

A Catalog of Galaxies: Mapping One Billion Light Years of the Universe
The map above shows the distances of every observable galaxy within one billion light years of Earth, with red, blue and green representing increasing distance groups. It’s the most complete mapping ever of galaxies within our billion-light-year neighborhood!
The Milky Way lies among a small neighborhood of fifty or so galaxies called the Local Group, itself drifting toward the thousand-plus group of the Virgo Supercluster, who make up just a miniscule portion of the more than 80 billion galaxies thought to exist in the observable universe. But how are they organized?
The map reinforces the idea that galaxies are not uniformly distributed, and that there are great areas of density like the Sloan Great Wall (the largest known structure in the universe, at 1.4 billion light years in length). It’s but a fraction of what’s out there.
This comes from a recently released paper, posthumously authored by John P. Huchra, a pioneer of galaxy mapping who was working on the project when he passed away. A fitting tribute from his colleagues.
(via SciTechDaily)

jtotheizzoe:

A Catalog of Galaxies: Mapping One Billion Light Years of the Universe

The map above shows the distances of every observable galaxy within one billion light years of Earth, with red, blue and green representing increasing distance groups. It’s the most complete mapping ever of galaxies within our billion-light-year neighborhood!

The Milky Way lies among a small neighborhood of fifty or so galaxies called the Local Group, itself drifting toward the thousand-plus group of the Virgo Supercluster, who make up just a miniscule portion of the more than 80 billion galaxies thought to exist in the observable universe. But how are they organized?

The map reinforces the idea that galaxies are not uniformly distributed, and that there are great areas of density like the Sloan Great Wall (the largest known structure in the universe, at 1.4 billion light years in length). It’s but a fraction of what’s out there.

This comes from a recently released paper, posthumously authored by John P. Huchra, a pioneer of galaxy mapping who was working on the project when he passed away. A fitting tribute from his colleagues.

(via SciTechDaily)

staceythinx:

Catherine Ulisky has painted the connections between the European starlings in these photographs to show the entire flock as one faceted geometric shape. 

Ulisky on her work:

My work presents and explores aspects of our surroundings in ways that are new to me, yet faithful to what exists in nature. Carefully observing natural phenomena reminds me constantly of the limitless complexity and wonder of the world we inhabit. It is an exciting, reciprocal process that continually reinvigorates my own appreciation for what is around me.

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

2,375 notes

"enBut at their core, artists and scientists are not so different from one another. Both endeavor to solve our greatest mysteries through the power of imagination. The great American playwright Eugene O’Neill described his work as an effort to explain the mysterious forces behind life that shape human destiny. I suspect Einstein could relate."

Bill O’Brien, National Endowment for the Arts

From The Imagine Engine! or Art and Science, exploring the creative practices of art and science and where they intersect, sometimes outside the comfort zones of either discipline. (h/t: jtotheizzoe)

(via mohandasgandhi)

556 notes

"

Palm oil facts:

* 90 per cent of Sumatra’s orangutan population has disappeared since 1900. They now face extinction

* 90 per cent of wildlife disappears when the forest is replaced by palm, creating a biological desert

* 98 per cent of Indonesia’s forests may be destroyed by 2022 according to the United Nations

* 43 of Britain’s 100 top grocery brands contain or are thought to contain palm oil

"

The Independent. Warning, article will infuriate. (via climateadaptation)

word. 

word. 

(Source: little-brownbook, via kazuvortex)

95,589 notes

(Source: kamikazernr, via tr0tskitty)

christiantheatheist:

f-e-r-a-l:


A donor heart beating in a mechanical system which keeps it warm, oxygenated, with nutrient enriched blood pumping through.

THATS FUCKING CRAZY

Things prayer can’t do

christiantheatheist:

f-e-r-a-l:

A donor heart beating in a mechanical system which keeps it warm, oxygenated, with nutrient enriched blood pumping through.

THATS FUCKING CRAZY

Things prayer can’t do

(Source: science-is-everything, via tr0tskitty)

671,327 notes


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