archeogirl:

Mithras.

A statue of Mithras in a Mithraeum under the Baths of Mithras in Ostia.

Spring 2013.

(Alas, due to rain it was flooded and too deep for me to wade in to see up close.)

(via museumofclassicalantiquities)

hellenic-macedonia:

Alexander the Great NEVER Slav-Bulgarian from Skopje-Fyrom!!

Robin Lane Fox, History Proffesor, Oxford University, historical advisor to the film director Oliver Stone for the epic Alexander.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Lane_Fox

sadighgallery:

Ancient Greek. Bronze sword has a flared hilt covered with a double raised ring pattern, the blade with a single raised ridge down the length. Green patina with heavy earthen encrustations. 400 BC (22”)

sadighgallery:

Ancient Greek. Bronze sword has a flared hilt covered with a double raised ring pattern, the blade with a single raised ridge down the length. Green patina with heavy earthen encrustations. 400 BC (22”)

5 notes

4,241 Plays

The Seikilos epitaph is the oldest surviving example of a complete musical composition, including musical notation, from anywhere in the world. The song, the melody of which is recorded, alongside its lyrics, in the ancient Greek musical notation, was found engraved on a tombstone, near Aidin, Turkey (not far from Ephesus). The find has been dated variously from around 200 BC to around AD 100 but the first century AD is the most probable guess. Also on the tombstone is an indication that states in Greek “Εἰκὼν ἡ λίθος εἰμί.Τίθησί με Σείκιλος ἔνθα μνήμης ἀθανάτου σῆμα πολυχρόνιον”, “I am a tombstone, an image. Seikilos placed me here as an everlasting sign of deathless remembrance”. While older music with notation exists (for example the Delphic Hymns), all of it is in fragments; the Seikilos epitaph is unique in that it is a complete, though short, composition.

(Source: gundemaro, via winged-serpent)

478 notes

antibig:

Symi Island - Dodekanes

Greece

13 notes

ginandjack:

hellenicproblems:

Hellenic Problems #39:
Failure to understand that modern Greek culture is very thoroughly Orthodox Christian and no-where near as tolerant and progressive  as their cultural ancestors.

Mmmmmmmhhhhhhmmmmmmm

ginandjack:

hellenicproblems:

Hellenic Problems #39:

Failure to understand that modern Greek culture is very thoroughly Orthodox Christian and no-where near as tolerant and progressive  as their cultural ancestors.

Mmmmmmmhhhhhhmmmmmmm

(via austro-nesian)

32 notes

"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit."

Aristotle (via chroniclesofdave)

6 notes

lonelyspelltoconjureyou:

Alexander the Great worshiping and praising Amon-Ra, from the Temple of Amon at Diospolis Megale (the Great City of Zeus, Thebes) For the recurrence of the birth of Alexander the Great, the Divine Son of Zeus-Ammon (24 july 2012=6 Hekatombaion of the Attic Calendar)

lonelyspelltoconjureyou:

Alexander the Great worshiping and praising Amon-Ra, from the Temple of Amon at Diospolis Megale (the Great City of Zeus, Thebes)
For the recurrence of the birth of Alexander the Great, the Divine Son of Zeus-Ammon (24 july 2012=6 Hekatombaion of the Attic Calendar)

"They [Ancient Greeks] understood the potentiality of human beings; their limitations and the predicament in which they live. Man is potent and important, yet he is fallible and mortal, capable of the greatest achievements and the worst crimes. He is then a tragic figure; powerful but limited, with freedom to choose and act but bound by his own nature, knowing that he will never achieve perfect knowledge and understanding, justice and happiness, but determined to continue searching no matter what."

Donald Kagan, Introduction to Ancient Greek History (Yale University)

(Source: bunnytier, via hosenalloikosmoi-archive)

collective-history:

The Nemean lion was a vicious monster in Greek mythology that lived at Nemea.

The first of Heracles’ twelve labours, set by King Eurystheus (his cousin) was to slay the Nemean lion.

According to one version of the myth, the Nemean lion took women as hostages to its lair in a cave near Nemea, luring warriors from nearby towns to save the damsel in distress. After entering the cave, the warrior would see the woman (usually feigning injury) and rush to her side. Once he was close, the woman would turn into a lion and kill the warrior, devouring his remains and giving the bones to Hades.

Heracles wandered the area until he came to the town of Cleonae. There he met a boy who said that if Heracles slew the Nemean lion and returned alive within 30 days, the town would sacrifice a lion to Zeus; but if he did not return within 30 days or he died, the boy would sacrifice himself to Zeus. Another version claims that he met Molorchos, a shepherd who had lost his son to the lion, saying that if he came back within 30 days, a ram would be sacrificed to Zeus. If he did not return within 30 days, it would be sacrificed to the dead Heracles as a mourning offering.

While searching for the lion, Heracles fetched some arrows to use against it, not knowing that its golden fur was impenetrable; when he found and shot the lion and firing at it with his bow, he discovered the fur’s protective property when the arrow bounced harmlessly off the creature’s thigh. After some time, Heracles made the lion return to his cave. The cave had two entrances, one of which Heracles blocked; he then entered the other. In those dark and close quarters, Heracles stunned the beast with his club and, using his immense strength, strangled it to death. During the fight the lion bit off one of his fingers. Others say that he shot arrows at it, eventually shooting it in the unarmored mouth. After slaying the lion, he tried to skin it with a knife from his belt, but failed. He then tried sharpening the knife with a stone and even tried with the stone itself. Finally, Athena, noticing the hero’s plight, told Heracles to use one of the lion’s own claws to skin the pelt. Others say that Heracles’ armor was, in fact, the hide of the lion of Cithaeron.

When he returned on the thirtieth day carrying the carcass of the lion on his shoulders, King Eurystheus was amazed and terrified. Eurystheus forbade him ever again to enter the city; in future he was to display the fruits of his labours outside the city gates. Eurystheus warned him that the tasks set for him would become increasingly difficult. He then sent Heracles off to complete his next quest, which was to destroy the Lernaean hydra. The Nemean lion’s coat was impervious to the elements and all but the most powerful weapons.

(via hosenalloikosmoi-archive)

68 notes

htmlwings:

The Seikilos epitaph is the oldest surviving example of a complete musical composition, including musical notation, from anywhere in the world.  [Read more]

(Source: html-wings, via hosenalloikosmoi-archive)

william1in100:

Linen Armor

There is a new idea that the army of Greece commanded by Alexander the Great wore armor made of linen. This linen armor was a build up of glued layers of linen that was then formed into a suit of armor. This was more lighter than the metal armor, giving it the added benefit of allowing more stealthy and/or rapid movement when necessary. This linen armor also with unbelievable is able to deflect arrows that are shot for a bow. Also this has been tested against bronze armor with the same thickness of the armor of the time; this was proved that the linen armor is more affective that the bronze. The bronze armor is no match against a arrow.

(via williamthegeek-deactivated20131)

theoslogos:

Similarities between Indra and Zeus

Indra - King of the Gods
Zeus - King of the Gods

Indra - Uses lightning as weapon
Zeus - Uses lightning as weapon

Indra - Fights with his father and wins
Zeus - Fights with his father and wins

(via currycub-deactivated20130131)

"For a man to conquer himself is the first and noblest of all victories."

Plato (via trippymouse)

(via twelfth-helix)

8 notes

lightandshadowsplay:

Holy processsion and hymn to God Apollo. Scenes from the celebration of “Charisia - Aphrodesa” by the Supreme Council of Ethnikoi Hellenes at the feet of Parnetha Mountain on April the 29th, “2012”. The rite was performed by the Ritual Thiassos “Delphys”.

(Source: facebook.com, via hellenismnow)

16 notes


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